Tag Archives: e-publishing

Links: the extrordinary poet Ruth Stone, and Barnes & Noble

In case anyone missed it back in November, you can read about the extraordinary poet Ruth Stone in the New York Times. I call her extraordinary not only because of her talent, but also because of her steadfast refusal during her lifetime to quit doing what she loved most: writing poetry.

She finally achieved literary success at the age 87 when she received a National Book Award in 2002. She’d been a poet for over 50 years by then and despite all she had been through had kept writing.

I couldn’t help thinking as I read about her life–what if she had given up on poetry in her fifties and sixties when things were rough? What if she hadn’t kept going? It was in her seventies that she began to break through.

In other links, Digital Book World has two great articles: one on Barnes & Noble’s strengths, and one on Barnes & Noble’s weaknesses. The article on the weaknesses includes a look at Amazon’s KDP program to contrast it to Barnes & Noble’s Pubit that is well worth the time to read.

More Signs of a Fun New Era for Writers

A writer friend of mine, R. G. Hart, did a blog post about his favorite memory of Halloween and listed his favorite movies and stories. Then at the end of the post he put together a collage of ebook covers in different sizes. Many of the writers in the collage are both traditionally and indie published, some have won awards, some have hit the bestseller lists on the Kindle or Barnes & Noble, and all of them are having a wonderful time experimenting with indie projects. I’m in the collage as well, but it’s the sight of so many talented writers getting to experiment that makes me smile.

Oddball and niche projects that are unappealing to traditional publishers don’t have to sit in a drawer anymore. And yet that oddball project can be the perfect opportunity to take risks and grow as a writer. Kristine Kathryn Rusch talks about the importance of this in her latest blog post today, Believe in Yourself.

Soul Cages is Getting a Much Better Cover

Okay, so I’m a bit excited. The new cover for Soul Cages is done, and is being uploaded. Some e-stores will take longer than others for the new cover to appear in (could take as long as a three weeks).

I didn’t think it was possible to make a cover that expressed the personality of the novel since it’s a strange cross-genre story, but the photo that was found nails the heart of the book so closely that I feel a bit stunned.

That’s one wonderful thing about the e-book era. It’s a lot more forgiving of a publishing startup’s learning curve in doing book covers. The cover for “Parallels” also got completely redone about two weeks ago to try and get closer to the feel of the story. Let’s just say that a magical realism story set at  Christmastime is darn difficult to convey in a cover and still have room for the author’s name and the title and some general info.

Now that this cover tinkering is over, more stories of mine will be rolling out in e-format this fall and winter. We’re hoping to be able to do print trade editions of novels and short story collections by fall of 2012–a rather steep learning curve awaits on that.

A Blog Post to Give Comfort in Rough Times, and a Few More Links

Kristine Kathryn Rusch has gone and written a blog post for all writers who are suffering through rough times right now due to the upheavals in publishing, “You Are Not Alone.” If you know a writer friend who is thinking of quitting writing or suffering from severe depression due to publishing industry changes, this essay is a must.

I also found out about a website that has various posts by pro writers (such as David Morrell) about the publishing industry.  It’s called Backspace – The Writer’s Place.

Another great resource is the NINC blog. Members of NINC have to be multi-published in order to join, so I find the information and blogs professional in tone and attitude.

Also, there’s Bob Mayer’s blog. He has 20 years of experience as a fiction writer in traditional publishing, and 2 years of experience doing indie publishing, so I find his posts have a lot of depth to them.

Albuquerque Comic Expo and Some Links

I was at the first ever 3-day Albuquerque Comic Expo (aka ACE), and so this week’s post is going to be brief because I want to take time to mull over everything I learned there. All I will say for now is that even if one doesn’t have an interest in screenwriting or writing for comic books and video games, go to one of these major conventions that are film, gaming, and comic book focused.  I came away from the convention with a fresh perspective on storytelling and what is happening in entertainment outside of the publishing industry.

Plus, they are also a terrific way to meet various artists, actors, and filmmakers, and pick up a lot of gossip about what is going on in the entertainment industry.  It also is a great way to learn how to act like a pro if in the future you get invited to a convention–as an anonymous attendee, you’ll learn what you like and what pisses you off in the behavior of celebrity guests.


Many have probably already heard about it, but Kickstarter is an amazing resource for raising funds for a major project in the arts. I heard excited comments from filmmakers and comic book artists about this website.

There’s an interesting article by Robin Sullivan on The New Midlist: Self-Published E-book Authors Who Make a Living. One of the things I love about Robin Sullivan is she always tries to include hard data when she can.

Bronnie Ware, who has worked in palliative care for those who wish to die at home, has written a list of the top 5 Regrets of the Dying.

Last night I saw a fascinating documentary called Nerdcore Rising on a rapper, MC Frontalot, who raps about the nerdy stuff he loves. The documentary starts as he begins his first ever national road tour as a musician and follows him until his triumphant end playing for thousands at Penny Arcade Expo. The film made me think about how the internet has made the “1000 True Fans” to support an artist possible. Also, a reminder of how hard artists need to work to get good enough to entertain a large crowd. If MC Frontalot had been lazy and just gone direct from his home town to the Expo gig without putting in all those long hours on the road to get better, he might have bombed.

The Passive Guy has had a terrific series of blog posts on the J. K. Rowling announcement of Pottermore, as well as a continuing series of brilliant posts on publishing contracts.  He’s a former lawyer, so you definitely don’t want to miss his lawyerly insights on contracts.