Tips for New Year’s Resolutions to Lose Weight

Welcome to 2016! I hope you are all well. It’s great to be back and doing a blog post. It’s been so quiet blog-wise because I went on overseas travel to Israel and Palestine to do research for future stories.

Mid-January is a good moment for me to pass on some learned wisdom about two common New Year’s Resolutions (at least here in the United States). By around now the excitement of possible change is fading away, to be replaced by the daily slog of reality. The two common resolutions I will cover are:

Goal 1 – Losing Weight

Goal 2 – Getting Organized

I’m not a professional expert on these two issues. I have, however, by trial and error stumbled onto advice from others that actually works and I want to pass that advice on as a way to pay it forward.

For this week’s blog post I’ll cover the goal of losing weight.

Goal 1 – Losing Weight

  1. Make peace with your body as it is today. Ditch the self-hate, because it gets in the way of feeling joy. Find outfits to wear that make you happy and confident now. Self-care needs to be a priority.
  2. Treat obesity as a disease, not a moral failing. It’s better to be dispassionate about this medical situation. Negative self-talk only increases the odds that stress eating and failure will occur.
  3. Schedule an appointment with your family doctor and talk about getting tested for diabetes, high cholesterol, thyroid problems, and other conditions. Also, you need a health assessment of how much weight you actually need to lose, if any. Eating disorders and unrealistic body goals are a genuine hazard.
  4. Before your body can permanently change, your mind must change. I strongly recommend reading a book on the psychology of weight loss before starting any diet and exercise program. Dr. Martha Beck’s The Four Day Win does a good job covering the behavioral and emotional issues involved with permanent weight loss.
  5. Food is fuel. Log the actual calories you’re consuming. Buy a food scale so you can measure anything you’re eating that doesn’t come with the exact calorie count. No self-shaming allowed. Watch yourself the way a scientist would and log the results each day.
  6. After an eating binge, pay attention to what was happening before and during the binge. Was there an emotional trigger? Log that information.
  7. Build a support team. If you need expert advice and guidance, get it. It’s a lot cheaper to hire a nutritionist and personal trainer for a few months than to pay the long-term medical bills involved with severe obesity.
  8. Aim for 1 tiny permanent healthy change in your life each week. One tiny change a week means that there will be 52 changes made in your life by the end of the year. They add up, fast. Really.  Also, a tiny change is easy to manage, even during a life crisis, and so going off track is unlikely to happen.

Next week I’ll be back with tips on getting organized.

 

The Passage into Autumn

Autumn has finally returned here in the Southwest, and we can feel the passing of summer into winter. The harvest and roasting of green chile is almost over, and the leaves have begun to brown along their edges on the trees.

If all goes well, there will be one more burst of blooms from the trimmed rose bBook cover Cubicles, Blood, and Magic by Lynn Kilmoreushes, and then they’ll go to sleep for the winter.

Some of you already know that the print edition of Cubicles, Blood, and Magic is a finalist in Science Fiction & Fantasy for the 2015 New Mexico-Arizona Book Awards. (The lists are a great way to find authors and publishers located in the Southwest to take a closer look at.)

I’ve been offline almost completely these past two months as I wrestle with the last 1/3 of the sequel novel to Cubicles, Blood, and Magic. What makes it so awkward is that I feel as if I’m collaborating with an earlier version of myself. The novel was started and the first draft finished back in 2013, then got derailed in the editing process due to severe illness and other difficulties.

Health-wise I am finally whole again. So things should get moving rather quickly as autumn passes into winter. I’m excited by what is to come.

I am not the same writer I was back in 2013. I’ve changed. A lot. So most of the sequel got rewritten this year from the ground up … but stays true enough to the 2013 version to not be a complete break from the past.

Book three in the Dorelai Chronicles will be where I can start with a clean slate from the first page.

So now, as the seasons pass from one extreme to another, is a good moment to pause, look around, and enjoy the change in the flowers, grass, and trees. Some parts of the world are waking up, and some are going to sleep. Whichever way it is, may it be wondrous to watch.

Pleasant days, Lynn

P.S. The short story in the Dorelai Chronicles universe,  A Maze of Cubicles, is still available to download for free from various e-bookstores. You can click here to find a partial list of stores. (Please note you may have to notify the Amazon store that it needs to be set back to free. It tends to randomly go off of free.)

Short story “By The Numbers” is out at Crossed Genres Magazine

Welcome to July 2015! I hope it’s going well for everyone.

I loved reading (and rereading) science fiction stories by Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke as a kid, and wanted to someday write a science fiction story that would express my admiration for their stories.

So I wrote a longish science fiction story (the length is actually referred to as a “novelette”) called “By The Numbers.”

I’m too close to my own work, so I can’t say if I succeeded in showing my admiration for Clarke and Asimov. I hope so.

The story is out this month, and available to read in full online for free, in the July 2015 issue of Crossed Genres Magazine. I hope you will click on over and read about Dr. Melaine Sharps at New Mexico Tech and a rather unusual alien species.

Dr. Sharps (the main character) just happens to have autism, and I am extremely grateful to all the people on the spectrum I’ve known over the past ten years who helped me do a realistic story about how it feels to be autistic.

While you’re over at Crossed Genres, check out the other July stories too.

Til next time, Lynn

Print Editions in June and New Stories on the Way

Pictures of print editionsHello! I hope you all are having a terrific June.

I’m happy to announce that print editions of Tales from the Threshold and Cubicles, Blood, and Magic are being released this month. I got two of the first print copies, and they look great.

These print editions are important for another reason–they had to be done before new novels of mine could be published.  From now on, my new releases will be in both e-book and print formats.

The sequel to Cubicles is up next in the pipeline … as well as a surprise.

Oh, and I’ve sold a science fiction short story to a respected market, and it is scheduled to be published this year. More on that once it gets closer to being available.

Also, a short story in the Dorelai Chronicles universe,  A Maze of Cubicles, is  available to download for free from various e-bookstores. You can click here to find a partial list of stores.

Cheers, Lynn

Spring Came Early This Year

Spring came early to the Southwest this year, and I’m taking a quick break from writing to share it with you.


The lilac bush is on the verge of bursting forth with blossoms. It smells wonderful when you stand underneath it.

Third picture of cherry tree branches by Lynn Kilmore

 

 

The cherry trees are in full bloom. They’re beautiful.

Another picture of cherry trees by Lynn Kilmore

 

 

 

Here’s two pictures of what you would see if you stood under the cherry trees and looked up through the branches.Picture of cherry tree by Lynn Kilmore

Spring has returned, and I am glad to see it.

Cheers, Lynn

P.S. My activity on blogging and social media has gone down to almost nothing because I am hard at work on finishing the edits to the sequel to Cubicles, Blood, and Magic. The finish line is in sight, though it’s beginning to look like the novel will still come in at 1/3 longer than the first book.